Camera Stabilization Techniques with HandlePod and an SLR

Use HandlePod with an SLR for Camera Stabilization

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HandlePod will support an SLR with proper adjustment of the camera mount.

HandlePod will accept cameras ranging from a smartphone with a tripod adapter to a prosumer SLR with a normal or kit lens such as an 18 to 70mm zoom. The maximum weight is approximately 2.5 pounds. A professional camera with a long lens would be too heavy. With any camera, but especially with an SLR, certain practices must be followed in order to get the best performance from the HandlePod. First of all, do not try to lock down the thumb screws that control tension on the joints. They do not lock, but depend on friction to hold the camera in place yet allow easy positioning of the camera by hand. Tighten the thumb screws just enough to keep the camera from slipping but loose enough that it can be moved easily in any direction. Some users have said that the small T-knobs on the camera mount are hard to turn. It is easier to hold the T-knob still with one hand and turn the camera mount with the other hand to tighten it. It only takes a tiny fraction of a turn to tighten the joint. Once the proper tension is set for the weight of the camera there is rarely any need to adjust it again. As with any camera support, but especially a small one holding a heavy camera, it is important not to touch the camera during exposure. Be sure to use a remote release or set the camera timer to two seconds to avoid vibration when tripping the shutter. If you are holding the HandlePod against a support, be sure to maintain a light, steady pressure and avoid hand movement. This will assure absolute camera stabilization during exposure. Observing these simple practices will give you reliable, tripod-like camera stability on any available support object. Good luck and good shooting.

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