Use Your Feet to Take Panorama Photos of Close Subjects

The previous blog described use of the panorama feature either in-camera or post processed in software to achieve a wide angle panorama. The basic technique is to stand in one place and pan the camera left to right for a series of overlapping images that can be spliced together. This works well for wide vistas and distant landscapes.

Mural art made of a four-photo Panorama stitched together in Photoshop.

But what if the subject is small and distance limited? That is the case with the above mural painted on a home in San Francisco’s Mission District. It is in a narrow alley famous for artwork decorating walls, doors and fences. It is difficult to get far enough away from some of these murals to take in all the artwork in one photo unless you have an extremely wide angle lens. Panning the camera from left to right as described earlier will work, but there is a better way.

Let Your Feet Do the Wide Angle Work

Start at the left side of the subject and take the first photo. Walk a few steps to the right and take another overlapping photo. Continue moving to the right and shooting until you reach the end of the subject. The photo below shows the four overlapping photos that make up the mural panorama.

mural panorama

Four overlapping photos used to create the mural panorama.

 Merge Images in Photoshop Elements

The four photos were stitched together in Photoshop Elements using Photomerge and Panorama to combine the images. The software does an excellent job of merging the images seamlessly. The illustration below shows how the different photos are broken up and the overlapping edges trimmed to match the adjoining image.

 

Photoshop panorama

Pieces of the individual photos shows how Photoshop breaks them into edges that match.

 

 

It is best to use the fill command to fill in blank areas of the photo. It does a reasonable job but usually you must crop off some of the filled image. The software introduces some distortion which can be corrected with the distort command.

And there you have it, a wide angle panorama created with your feet instead of an expensive super wide angle lens.

 

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